John Kissick Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting

Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting

Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting

Vancouver Art Gallery
Canada

On September 30, 2017, the Vancouver Art Gallery opens Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting which will be on view until January 1, 2018, featuring artists and painting practices from across the country.

The story of contemporary painting in Canada is constantly changing, and for good reason—dynamic and influential art practices, wildly differing opinions and strongly held beliefs make for a charged atmosphere in art schools, studios and public and private galleries. Within the community of painters, strong ideas give shape to new modes of painting and new techniques that are in turn shared, debated, tested and critiqued in studios across Canada.

Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting offers insight into two distinctly different approaches that have come to dominate contemporary painting in this country. The origins of both can be traced back to the 1970s, to a moment when the continued existence of painting was hotly debated.

Within that debate, two new strategies were devised, one that proposed the possibility of conceptual painting—a notion of painting that emerged from and returned to the idea—and a second painting proposition that valued actions and materiality over ideas—in short, doing and making were pitted against ideas and concepts. Entangled traces the legacy of that debate and documents the artists who have been largely responsible for the strong revival that painting now enjoys in this country.

“Entangled offers a timely opportunity to explore on a national scale the origins and contemporary manifestations of paintings in this country,” says Kathleen S. Bartels, Director of the Vancouver Art Gallery. “With work by thirty-one artists from Halifax to Victoria and many places in-between, the exhibition carries this significant national conversation into the present while offering a survey of the lively debates that have come to make painting relevant and meaningful today.”

Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting is presented from two conjugate curatorial perspectives. The first, Art As Idea as Painting, curated by artist and Emily Carr University of Art + Design professor David MacWilliam, will feature artists Neil Campbell, Tammi Campbell, Arabella Campbell, Allyson Clay, Gerald Ferguson, Neil Harrison, Jeremy Hof, Garry Neill Kennedy, Guido Molinari, Guy Pellerin, Francine Savard, Jeffrey Spalding, Ron Terada, Claude Tousignant and Julie Trudel.

The second, Performative Painting, curated by Vancouver Art Gallery Senior Curator Bruce Grenville, will feature artists Stephanie Aitken, Marvin Luvualu António, Rebecca Brewer, Sarah Cale, Eric Fischl, Jessica Groome, Colleen Heslin, John Heward, John Kissick, Elizabeth McIntosh, Sandra Meigs, Paterson Ewen, Jeanie Riddle, Michael Snow, Nathalie Thibault and Joyce Wieland.

Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting will be accompanied by a 112-page publication with texts by the two curators.

Exhibition support generously provided by:

Phil Lind

The Timothy C. Kerr Family Foundation

More information: vanartgallery.bc.ca

John Kissick burning the houses of cool man, yeah No.5 (hang the DJ), 2016 Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting Courtesy of Katzman Contemporary

John Kissick
burning the houses of cool man, yeah No.5 (hang the DJ), 2016
Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting
Courtesy of Katzman Contemporary

John Kissick Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting

John Kissick
Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting

Shelagh Keeley Notes on Obsolescence, 2014 acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Persistence group exhibition – Vancouver Art Gallery

Persistence

Vancouver Art Gallery
Canada

June 24 to October 1, 2017

Persistence draws together three recent contemporary installations by Canadian artists to explore the surprising and creative ways that technologies, physical objects and natural processes endure and transform. Featuring recently acquired works from the collection presented for the first time at the Gallery, the exhibition’s premise is inspired by media critic Marshall McLuhan’s ideas concerning the role of obsolescence in sparking creativity and the invention of new order. McLuhan’s writing is referenced in the title of Toronto-based Shelagh Keeley’s Notes on Obsolescence (2014), a large-scale multimedia wall work that prompts references to technological and capitalist cycles. The exhibition also present a collaborative installation by Vancouver-based artists Julia Feyrer and Tamara Henderson. Invoking theatre, play, myth and ritual, The Last Waves: Laboratory (2016) recycles and animates various found and fabricated objects in a capricious, sometimes disorienting response to materials. Vancouver artist Germaine Koh’s Fair-weather forces (water level) (2008) also recasts the familiar in unpredictable ways. Koh’s minimalist sculpture features a row of stanchions with velvet ropes that rise and fall in response to tidal levels, dramatizing the persistence of nature’s processes and their profound ability to shape and regulate our lives. Each of these three works raises insightful propositions about perseverance, especially during this time of social and political upheavals.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Daina Augaitis, Chief Curator/Associate Director.

Generously supported by:
Michael O’Brian Family Foundation

More information: vanartgallery.bc.ca

Shelagh Keeley Notes on Obsolescence, 2014 acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid - Persistence, Vancouver Art Gallery

Shelagh Keeley
Notes on Obsolescence, 2014
acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift
Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Offsite: Khan Lee - Vanouver Art Gallery

Offsite: Khan Lee – Vanouver Art Gallery

Offsite: Khan Lee

November 5, 2016 to April 17, 2017

Vancouver, Canada

Offsite: Khan Lee – Vancouver artist Khan Lee’s Red, Green and Blue is a sculptural installation that uses filtered light to animate nature. Drawing on broad references of horizon lines and landscape art, Lee enables passers-by to visualize the wind.

Building on a sense of theatricality, Lee’s installation acts as an elaborate set comprised of three-dimensional objects that cast larger-than-life shadows against an enormous backdrop. Red, Green and Blue draws viewers into the intersections of artifice and nature within an abundant field of transparent cones fabricated from sheets of hand-folded plastic film. It is both painting and sculpture, using light filtered through red, green and blue lighting gels to project an immersive field of coloured grass-like forms on the architecture of Offsite.

Although an oasis literally refers to the greenery within a desert, it also describes a peaceful location or imagined place where one might escape the rigours of everyday life. Lee’s oasis unfolds into an array of colourful and contemplative possibilities that break up the monotony of grey surroundings.

Khan Lee was born in Seoul, Korea. He studied architecture at Hong-Ik University, before immigrating to Canada to study fine art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Through sculptural and media practices, his work attempts to exhibit results of experimentation with form and process in order to express inherent relationships between material and immaterial content. He is a founding member of the Vancouver-based artist collective Intermission and is presently a member of the Instant Coffee artist collective. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Lee lives and works in Vancouver, BC.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Diana Freundl, Associate Curator, Asian Art. Presented as part of Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures, a triennial exhibition surveying contemporary art in Vancouver presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery from December 3, 2016 to April 17, 2017.

Offsite is funded by the City of Vancouver through the Public Art Program. The Gallery recognizes Ian Gillespie, President, Westbank; Ben Yeung, President, Peterson Investment Group; and the residents of Shangri–La for their support of this space.

Offsite: Khan Lee is the fourteenth installation in the Gallery’s Offsite series.

More information: www.vanartgallery.bc.ca