Ernesto Neto, Flower Crystal Power, 2014 Vue d'installation d'Ernesto Neto: Gratitude à Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, 2014 Photographe : Tony Prikryl Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery

Infinite Garden – Centre Pompidou-Metz

Infinite Garden

From Giverny to Amazonia

Centre Pompidou-Metz
Metz, Lorraine

18th March to 28th August 2017

It was believed that gardens had been buried by modernity under the triumph of green spaces limiting the organic to functional areas. Yet, they remain a source of fertile inspiration all along the 20th century and continue to deeply appeal to many artists. The garden captivates, not only for its nourishing, curative and ornamental virtues but also for its subversion. Beyond the enclosed and organised space, the garden of this exhibition is a harbour for blurred, licentious and undisciplined private passions. A place of resistance and dissidence, of the most exquisite refinement as of the most wild exuberance, it becomes a biological, ethical and political laboratory. Backward intellectual currents such as Mannerism, the Decadent movement or Surrealism invade this space, opened to the incongruous and the irregular. Mostly contemporary, the works gather together for this exhibition draw the outlines of an obscure, chaotic and unpredictable experimental garden.

This exhibition in the Centre Pompidou-Metz depicts nature in the perspective of a metaphorical spring. Germination, blossoming and degeneration suggest the cycles of Earth, where the winter stop is the promise for future revolutions. Many artists venerate this vital momentum. Around 1912, in his essay about Creation in the Plastic Arts, František Kupka who is fascinated by the sexual reproduction of flowers, worships “a real pollen festival in the gynoecium bathed in sunlight” and translates theses celebrations in the organic impulse of Cosmic Spring (1913-14). Fertile ground of forms, the garden inspires artists with morphologies and fantastic metamorphoses revealing the intelligence of a nonhuman world. The explorations of the Earth lead to the ends of the known nature towards unspoiled territories that become new reserves of forms and motifs. Thus, fantasising the exotic nature, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster creates a tropical diorama, a proliferating garden-library in line with a series of installations inspired from illusionist’s devices of the 19th century. The Brazilian Ernesto Neto takes the Forum of the Centre Pompidou-Metz with a monumental sculpture, Leviathan-Main-Toth (2005), whose membranes take the shape of a biological landscape on a building scale.

The garden is also the place of genetic bifurcation which alters determinisms in favour of evolution. While he immortalises in his glass framed herbarium a cherished flora, Émile Gallé takes interest for the anomalies – Are the Orchids wonders or monstrosities? At the same time, Claude Monet creates hybrids and gets plants from all over the world, triggering the ire of the local farmers who fear poisoning by these foreign flowers. A century later, Pierre Huyghe creates “condensates of Giverny” in climate-programmed aquariums. If acclimation awakes the naturalists’ curiosity, it also serves the interest of a “botanic of power”, working on the colonisation then the eradication of “green pests”. Yto Barrada, Thu Van Tran and Simon Starling study the problematic of coexistence between “native” and “neophyte” plant species. Beyond the exoticism, the tropical and biomorphic alternatives of Roberto Burle-Marx or Lina Bo Bardi in Latin America and in Brazil revivify the functionalism of the European modernity.

At a time of intense intermixing, melting pot and migration phenomena which constantly reconfigure the biodiversity, the original fence of the garden, being material or conceptual, needs to be revaluated. The exhibition takes the garden out of itself, going beyond the dialectic on which Michel Foucault had articulated during his conference “Of Other Spaces” in 1967, his heterotypic definition of the garden as “the smallest parcel of the world” and as the “totality of the world.” During the symposium Rethinking boundaries: architecture through space, time and disciplines, organised at the INHA (National Institute for Art History) in 2005, the garden historians Monique Mosser and Hervé Brunon postulate that “it is now necessary to think the enclosure as an open, material and living system at the same time.” Henceforth, the abolition of borders opens on an incessant quest, started as early as in the 16th century with the Dream of Poliphilus, where the garden, ideal place for research and initiation, opens on an infinity of gardens.

For Infinite Garden, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané creates an organic, earthly and solar scenery where he invites the visitor to wander among the immersive installations of the exhibition with the delight of a gardener.

Imagined like a territory without borders, the exhibition expands to the city of Metz through different gardens set up by the artists Peter Hutchinson, François Martig and Loïs Weinberger. A catalogue realised by the graphic designer Fanette Mellier and an anthology of texts from many artists on gardens, first compilation of a new collection launched by Centre Pompidou-Metz, comes along with the exhibition.

Curators :
Emma Lavigne, Director, Centre Pompidou-Metz
Hélène Meisel, Research and Exhibition Officer, Centre Pompidou-Metz

More information: www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

Ernesto Neto, Flower Crystal Power, 2014 Vue d'installation d'Ernesto Neto: Gratitude à Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, 2014 Photographe : Tony Prikryl Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery

Ernesto Neto, Flower Crystal Power, 2014 Vue d’installation d’Ernesto Neto: Gratitude à Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, 2014 Photographe : Tony Prikryl Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery

Sebastian Kite - We will meet in the place where there is no darkness - South Kiosk

Sebastian Kite exhibition – South Kiosk

Sebastian Kite

“We will meet in the place where there is no darkness”

10 February – 04 March 2017 Opening hours: Thurs-Sat, 12-6pm
South Kiosk
London

In George Orwell’s dystopian classic 1984, the author makes reference to a place where there is no darkness. A place, our lead protagonist Winston Smith believes to be free from the oppression of the totalitarian state under which he lives. Deceived to visit this place by the state Police, Smith instead finds himself under the glaring lights of an interrogation cell, permanently lit to aid his state of torture.

For We will meet in the place where there is no darkness artist Sebastian Kite has created a site-specific installation exploring the relationship between space, light and sound. Constructed as a pavilion within the gallery space, Kite’s work references back to Orwell’s interrogation room using light as a material to create an ever-evolving space. Constructed from a series of half-toned panels that suggest static or white noise, the space is further cut through it’s horizontal with a two-way mirror referencing the voyeurism, narcissism and sublimity at the heart of the interrogation process. Spatialised sound further acts to reinforce the dynamic while also dividing the space into four distinct areas.

Introduced into this space, a dancer acts as a protagonist, with each performance redefining the relationship between the architecture and the audio-visual score and composition. Held once a week live in the space, performances create a generative interplay of media creating an ever-evolving space over the lifetime of the exhibition.

Sebastian Kite (b. 1986) is an installation artist and architect based in London. Kite creates experiential environments to choreograph the sensory engagement of people with architectural spaces. His practice lies at the intersection of art and architecture, with a particular focus on site-specificity. Beginning with an analysis of the site, Kite’s installations use structure, kinetics, light, performance, projection and sound as strategies to illustrate new readings of spaces.

Kite graduated as an architect in 2010 (Glasgow School of Art, Westminster School of Architecture) and also has a background in music. Kite has exhibited work in both Europe and the US and is co-founder of Kite & Laslett studio, he also currently works as lead architect and designer at London-based design agency Jotta Studio. Notable works include Hue that toured Sweden, Berlin and London (2015) and AA (2015).

Performances
February: Thurs 9 (6-9pm), Sat 11 (2-4pm), Sat 18 (12-2pm), Sat 25 (2-4pm), March: Sat 4 (2-4pm)

More information: www.southkiosk.com

IPATIEV, 2016, © Keith Milow, courtesy Dadiani Fine Art

Keith Milow exhibition – IT, IT, IT, IT. – London

Keith Milow

IT, IT, IT, IT.

Dadiani Fine Art
2nd February — 3rd March 2017

Dadiani Fine Art in London presents “IT, IT, IT, IT.”, an exhibition of new paintings by the celebrated
British painter, sculptor and printmaker, Keith Milow.

From the late 1960s through the 1970s, alongside contemporaries such as Richard Long, Gilbert & George, Michael Craig-Martin, Barry Flanagan, David Tremlett, Art & Language and Derek Jarman, Keith Milow helped to shape a critical point of British art history, and this exhibition is a rare and long overdue opportunity to see the works of a central member of Britain’s artistic avant-garde.

The works in IT, IT, IT, IT., all executed over the last three years, are a striking continuation of Milow’s fascination with architecture and the illusory effect of artistic materials (in the 1970s, among other innovations, he established the technique of combing paint onto paper and canvas). These themes and approaches—including the abstract, monumental, and post-minimalist manners for which he is recognised—have inspired and informed his work throughout his career. In both two-dimensional and three-dimensional works, often employing symbols such as crosses and cenotaphs, he has concerned himself with the subject’s purity of shape, the space it anchors, and the materials, textures and colours that transform it from literal symbol into an abstract construct.

This new suite of paintings continues the mathematical precision, which also alludes to his great influence the Dutch painter, Piet Mondrian, almost giving them the appearance of being computer generated, but very much celebrating the man-made which has also been a primary source of inspiration throughout his career. Indeed he is recognised as, ‘a Romanticist of the Man-Made’.

In her introduction to the exhibition’s catalogue, Jo Melvin, Reader in Archives and Special Collections at Chelsea College of Arts and Senior Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute, explores these themes in response to the titular painting, IT, IT, IT, IT. (2016): ‘Milow constructs a multi-layered system of representation by combining patterns of geometric and mathematical sequences with formal mark making, gesture and controlled chance. In IT, IT, IT, IT., the systematic gradations of grey in repeated triangular shapes creates an optical effect – like cladding on a high modernist building. Organic forms echo those found in Henry Moore, Jean Arp and Francis Picabia. Two series of dots, one blue, the other luminous yellow punctate the surface. These emphasise the painting’s post-modernist position, painting in inverted commas. Milow describes the tiny circles as speech marks that, rather like punctuation, repeat across his recent paintings.’

The title of the painting, IT, IT, IT, IT., in turn takes its name from a phrase in Philip Glass and Robert Wilson’s abstract opera, Einstein on the Beach (1976). The opera replaces traditional narrative in favour of a formalist approach based on structured spaces which ties in very well to Milow’s exploration in how space anchors his subjects. The titles of many of Milow’s works respond to existing works from other disciplines, including opera, poetry, architecture, in addition to paintings and sculptures by other artists. This adds yet another fascinating layer to his approach.

With his painting, IPATIEV (2016), there is an extra layer that Milow was not initially aware of, in that he painted the work in response to the Gury Nikitin’s frescoes in the Ipatiev Monastery in Kostroma, Russia, which was where the first Romanov Tsar, Mikhail, was declared in 1613. A few days after titling the work, he discovered that Ipatiev House, in Yekaterinburg, Russia, was where the last Romanov Tsar, Nicholas II, and his family were executed in 1918. ‘I have often favoured titles that are ambiguous or have a double meaning,’ Milow says, ‘but this title has its own kind of double meaning and coincidence woven into it.’

More information: www.dadianifineart.com

IPATIEV, 2016, © Keith Milow, courtesy Dadiani Fine Art

IPATIEV, 2016, © Keith Milow, courtesy Dadiani Fine Art

IT, IT, IT, IT., 2016, © Keith Milow, courtesy Dadiani Fine Art

IT, IT, IT, IT., 2016, © Keith Milow, courtesy Dadiani Fine Art

© Jack Whitten Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Jack Whitten exhibition – Hauser & Wirth – New York

Jack Whitten

26 January – 8 April 2017

Hauser & Wirth
New York

Hauser & Wirth presents its first exhibition devoted to the work of American abstractionist Jack Whitten. The show will feature selections from the artist’s newest bodies of work from 2015 – 2017, including tessellated paintings from the series Spatial Dialogues, Quantum Walls, and Portals; a piece from Whitten’s ongoing Black Monolith project honoring African-American visionaries; and assorted lenticular works on evolon. Lushly material explorations of space and its apertures, these works celebrate the distinctive painterly language that Whitten has developed over the course of a five-decade career.

‘Jack Whitten’ will remain on view at Hauser & Wirth’s West 22nd Street space through 8 April 2017.

Moving to New York City to study art at Cooper Union in the early 1960s, Whitten was exposed to a range of influences, from the vigorous paintings of fellow artists Willem de Kooning and Norman Lewis, to the rich complexity of bebop. Within this cultural milieu he developed an experimental style that combined the expressive physicality of gestural abstraction with the conceptual rigor of systems art. A radical breakthrough in 1970 provided the basis for his mode of working today: lifting a thick slab of acrylic paint off its support, Whitten realized that paint could be coaxed into the form of an independent object, challenging preexisting ideas about dimensionality in visual art. He began to lay sliced acrylic ribbons in wet, uneven elds of paint, mimicking the setting of mosaic tessarae into wet masonry. ‘For painting, that’s a new space,’ Whitten once said. ‘I first saw a glimpse of that space in the 70s, and I’ve been chasing it ever since. But now I’ve chased it up to a point where I can force it into a corner.’

It is no coincidence that the tessellated appearance of the new paintings on view at Hauser & Wirth calls to mind satellite imagery of topographies rendered in pixels and bits. Whitten, who nurtures a passion for astrophysics, views abstraction as an area in which he can probe space and time as both scientist and mystic. Works from the Portals series, begun in 2015 with ‘First Portal’, explicitly tempt the viewer into cosmological rabbit holes; their effects evoke planetary passageways as seen through a telescope. These works seductively imply partially veiled other worlds. ‘I practice thought experiments in abstract painting,’ Whitten has said of this series: ‘Thought experiments allow me to…travel anywhere I want without the encumbrance of matter.’

The Portals series led Whitten to his majestically-scaled Quantum Walls paintings, a series of five works begun in 2016, with the fth completed in January 2017. Shimmering with brilliantly colored acrylic tiles, these works celebrate the beauty of the universe’s fundamental opposition to closure. ‘Quantum mechanics has rendered obsolete any notion of a wall,’ Whitten explained. ‘Quantum Walls is not to be misunderstood as a stand-in for utopia… I only want that which is possible.’

The exhibition introduces viewers to Whitten’s little-known sculptural practice with ‘Quantum Man (The Sixth Portal)’ (2016), a work that combines such disparate materials as marble, Cretan walnut, Serbian oak, lead, and acrylic, to startling effect. The sculpture’s human scale invites reflection upon how our bodies exist in space and, by extension, in relationship to other bodies, other souls.

The exhibition forays into a celebration of humanity with the painting ‘Black Monolith X, Birth of Muhammad Ali’ (2016). This work is part of Whitten’s ongoing Black Monolith series, which memorializes important black artists, writers, thinkers, and poets. Whitten has said that this body of work uses abstract symbols to ‘honor our own and

grieve our own,’ adding a very personal note: ‘The passing of Muhammad Ali was extremely painful for me. His raw, primal power channeled through the plasticity of boxing is something I seek in painting.’

Holes, apertures, and coded space are the subject of Jack Whitten’s Spatial Dialogue works. In these paintings forms double as voids in opalescent fields of tessarae. The artist’s engagement with astrophysics and metaphysics informs the series The Folding of Spacetime, in which the titular folds evoke wormholes in deep space, as well as his drawings on evolon, including the series Presence and The Third Entity. Here we see Whitten combining the smudged abstraction and ethereality of his 1964 Head series, with the highly processed effects of his 1970s experiments with Xerox’s dry electrostatic printing technology. The resulting images here have an otherworldly and even hypnotic appearance. Drawing the viewer in, they create doors to other states of consciousness.

The exhibition comes to a thematic head in the 2016 series The Doubt of Being, comprising six tessellated canvases in a gleaming aquatic blue, and Three Stages of Doubt, three grisaille drawings made of Renaissance wax and dry pigment on evolon. In these we find Whitten giving form to the natural predilection for questioning that is so fundamental to artists and scientists; in so doing, he renders paintings with the authority of philosophical inquiry.

More information: www.hauserwirth.com

© Jack Whitten Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

© Jack Whitten
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Myuran Sukumaran

Myuran Sukumaran – Another Day in Paradise

Myuran Sukumaran

13 January – 26 March 2017

Campbelltown Arts Centre
Sydney, Australia

Campbelltown Arts Centre and Sydney Festival present the first major exhibition by artist Myuran Sukumaran along with a series of newly commissioned artworks by leading Australian artists, Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Megan Cope, Jagath Dheerasekara, Taloi Havini, Khaled Sabsabi, and Matthew Sleeth, whose works respond to the death penalty and profile human rights.

Curated by Ben Quilty and Michael Dagostino, Another Day In Paradise presents a vast and sobering series of powerful portraits by Sukumaran, painted during his incarceration at Bali’s Kerobokan jail and from his final incarceration on Nusa Kambangan Island.

This exhibition highlights the importance of forgiveness and compassion for humanity, while proving the profound power of art to change lives.

Extended opening hours – This exhibition will be open until 10pm on 20, 21, 27 and 28 January.
Campbelltown Arts Centre and Sydney Festival present the first major exhibition by artist Myuran Sukumaran along with a series of newly commissioned artworks by leading Australian artists, Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Megan Cope, Jagath Dheerasekara, Taloi Havini, Khaled Sabsabi, and Matthew Sleeth, whose works respond to the death penalty and profile human rights.

Curated by Ben Quilty and Michael Dagostino, Another Day In Paradise presents a vast and sobering series of powerful portraits by Sukumaran, painted during his incarceration at Bali’s Kerobokan jail and from his final incarceration on Nusa Kambangan Island.

This exhibition highlights the importance of forgiveness and compassion for humanity, while proving the profound power of art to change lives.

Extended opening hours – This exhibition will be open until 10pm on 20, 21, 27 and 28 January.

More information: www.c-a-c.com.au

Myuran Sukumaran

Myuran Sukumaran

The Aeneid Book VI, Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney, G. 2016, silkscreen on silver leaf, 117 x 38 cm, folded © the artists, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney – Shapero Modern

Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney

25 January – 18 February 2017
Shapero Modern
London

Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney: Maestro Arts and Shapero Modern present Jan Hendrix’s first UK solo exhibition, featuring works from The Aeneid Book VI, his most recent collaboration with Seamus Heaney.

Shortly before his death in August 2013, Heaney had completed his translation of the Aeneid Book VI and had started working on a collector’s publication with Jan Hendrix and Hans van Eijk (Bonnefant Press). It was the proofs from this draft that enabled the Heaney family/estate and Faber & Faber (official publisher of Heaney’s work) to decide on the ‘final’ edition, published earlier this year to international acclaim.

Hendrix and Heaney had formed a friendship collaborating on two previous occasions. In 1992 Hendrix had illustrated The Golden Bough, Heaney’s earlier translation of a part of Aeneid Book VI. A second book, The Light of the Leaves, followed in 1999: poems mostly dedicated to his friends, all poets, Hughes, Brodsky, Herbert. It also carried images of the landscape of Yagul, this time printed in stark black and white on Nepalese paper.

For this latest collaboration, Hendrix has chosen to portray the landscape in a Dantesque setting in accordance with Book VI. Says Hendrix: “…As a farewell to a dear friend and a dear place, I have vowed never to return to Yagul again. The images are made in a panoramic fashion, as if standing on the great rock watching over the surrounding valleys. Strangely enough the cactuses that I portrayed in 1992 and 1999 and the years in between are now dying and disappearing.”

The exhibition and book launch on 24th January have the full support of the Heaney family and will be introduced by Seamus Heaney’s daughter, Catherine Heaney.

More information: www.shaperomodern.com

Africa House The White Sea 2 © Jan Hendrix.

Africa House The White Sea 2 © Jan Hendrix.

The Aeneid Book VI, Seamus Heaney and Jan Hendrix (Bonnefant Press, 2016), interior view © Heaney estate, Jan Hendrix, Bonnefant Press, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

The Aeneid Book VI, Seamus Heaney and Jan Hendrix (Bonnefant Press, 2016), interior view
© Heaney estate, Jan Hendrix, Bonnefant Press, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

The Aeneid Book VI, Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney, G. 2016, silkscreen on silver leaf, 117 x 38 cm, folded © the artists, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

The Aeneid Book VI, Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney, G. 2016, silkscreen on silver leaf, 117 x 38 cm, folded
© the artists, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

The Aeneid Book VI, Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney, G. 2016, silkscreen on silver leaf, 117 x 38 cm © the artists, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

The Aeneid Book VI, Jan Hendrix with Seamus Heaney, G. 2016, silkscreen on silver leaf, 117 x 38 cm
© the artists, courtesy of Shapero Modern and Maestro Arts

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities

Tomás Saraceno

Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities
December 17, 2016–May 21, 2017

Tomás Saraceno’s immersive installation works are visually arresting spaces that challenge viewers’ relationship to the built world. Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities offers a model for the utopian cities of the future, conjuring an era in which humanity ceases to negatively impact our planet’s fossil-fuel resources, and instead becomes airborne in collective sustainable environments. In this exhibition, visitors wind their way through and below an array of cloud-like, geometrically complex cities, suspended in the air by tethers connecting the structures to the gallery walls, floor, and ceiling.

Trained as an architect and visual artist, Saraceno’s research-based practice draws from scientific investigations into physics, biology, cosmology, and engineering. His work has deep sociological motives, with undercurrents of human interconnectivity and universal engagement in the pursuit and provocation of a utopian future. In Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities, his visionary proposals for airborne cities build upon the artistic and architectural experimentation, forward-thinking radicalism, and progressive social change of the 1960s and 70s.

More information: www.sfmoma.org

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion, Cloud Cities, 2016 (installation view, SFMOMA)

alan cote

Alan Cote – “New York” – Fort Gansevoort Gallery

Alan Cote

“New York”

January 11 – February 7, 2017

Fort Gansevoort Gallery
New York

Fort Gansevoort presents an exhibition of recent paintings, gouaches, and process drawings by Alan Cote, filling three floors of Fort Gansevoort’s exhibition space in the Meatpacking District, between January 11 – February 7, 2017.

Having spent the early part of his career living and working in Tribeca, in the 1980s Alan Cote relocated his practice to a former tugboat factory two hours upstate in the Hudson River Valley. Today his studio occupies a repurposed brick high school gymnasium where he continues to develop a personal vocabulary within formal abstraction.

New Work includes a selection of eight gouaches, two dimensional drawings, and six large-scale paintings. Cote’s formal investigation is anchored in the relationship established between the paired panels of each painting, which affect one another not only through harmony, opposition and color play, but also through the perceived directional motion of the “elements” that populate their surfaces. Likened by some writers to “geometric gestures,” Cote’s elements are energetic forms that oscillate between line and shape, a key component in the visual language of Cote’s work.

His process of making a painting begins with sketchbook notations and graduates toward a more finished form of dimensional drawings on graph paper, where the element positions are set. Those compositions are then transferred onto watercolor paper to form the basis of his gouache color studies. In the last leg of his process, Cote creates large scale paintings where the color relationships and tonality of his elements are some of the final things to change.

Alan Cote was born in in Windham Conneticut in 1937. He earned an MA in the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1960 and received a Fellowship from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, for travel and study in Europe from 1961 to 1964. He had his first solo exhibition in New York City in 1970 at Reese Palley Gallery. He had a number of shows at the Betty Cunningham Gallery, New York in the 1970’s, as well as numerous international exhibitions, and also showed with the Washburn Gallery, New York, during the 1980’s. Cote has participated in survey exhibitions of painting at the American Federation for the Arts Whitney Museum of American Art. A Guggenheim Fellow, he has been awarded grants by the Creative Artists’ Public Service and National Endowment for the Arts. Cote’s work resides in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, among others. His work also resides in many corporate collections such as the Prudential Insurance Company, the Paine Webber Group and IBM in Armonk, NY.

More information: www.fortgansevoort.com

alan cote

alan cote

alan cote

alan cote

de-kooning-zao-wou-ki

Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki’ – Lévy Gorvy

Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki’

January 18 – March 11, 2017

Lévy Gorvy
909 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10021

Lévy Gorvy presents the first exhibition ever to pair the abstract landscapes of Chinese-French master Zao Wou-Ki (1920-2013) and Dutch-born American titan Willem de Kooning (1904-1997). With the full support of the Willem de Kooning Trust and the Fondation Zao Wou-Ki, this exhibition will inaugurate the new partnership of Dominique Lévy and Brett Gorvy, and will be the first presentation in their gallery’s expanded space at 909 Madison Avenue. ‘Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki’ will later travel to Hong Kong.

Although contemporaries, the two postwar masters of painting never met, and the exhibition at Lévy Gorvy marks the first time their work will be presented together. With a selection of over twenty paintings spanning from the late 1940s through the early 1980s, ‘Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki’ intends to bridge an East-West dialogue, placing the two artists in conversation by means of their work. De Kooning’s Sail Cloth and Zao’s Untitled, both created in 1949, open the exhibition and indelibly illuminate ways in which issues of surface, representation, depth, and coloration would similarly preoccupy both artists throughout their careers. Seminal large-scale canvases – including such key museum loans as Zao’s Montagne déchirée (1955 – 56) from the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and de Kooning’s Untitled (1962) from the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C. – will be on view. And side-by-side juxtapositions will reveal striking affinities between the two artists, suggesting heretofore unrecognized connections between the ways in which de Kooning and Zao addressed composition and motif to achieve breakthroughs that remain relevant to contemporary painting.

Lévy Gorvy will present a series of programs in conjunction with ‘Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki.’ The gallery will publish a fully illustrated hardbound catalogue featuring essays by leading scholars, including Robert E. Harrist Jr., Jane and Leopold Swergold Professor of Chinese Art History at Columbia University; and Dominique de Villepin, former Prime Minister of France. In addition, the book will contain original poems by Cole Swenson and Diane Ward, as well as a chronology contextualizing the two painters in the rich goings-on in China, Paris, and America at the time, constructed by Melissa Ward.

About the Exhibition
Zao Wou-Ki’s abstract landscapes entail a rethinking of the aesthetic terms defining man’s relationship to nature. Defying centuries of convention in Chinese art, Zao abandoned the subject in landscape painting while retaining a transcendental quality through his use of color, line, and scale. Conversely, Willem de Kooning arrived at the abstract landscape through a deep consideration of the figure. He began painting the female body as a kind of landscape: portraits liberated from form, with ground and body collapsing onto each other. Through the deployment of expressionist gestures that traverse his subjects with dividing lines and brilliant colors, de Kooning helped broaden the very idea of figurative painting.

Rather than equating the two artists, the exhibition at Lévy Gorvy seeks to initiate a dialogue between their sensibilities and approaches to the language of abstraction. Neither artist completely abandoned the representational tradition; instead, each worked abstractly within the parameters of landscape imagery. Comparing their work, the exhibition reveals a subterranean resonance that traversed the art world in the immediate postwar generation.

The contemporaneous development of the abstract landscape for Zao and de Kooning in 1953-54 is particularly striking as the point of intersection for artists born of two different cultural and art-historical backgrounds, speaking the same language across the divide that separates East from West. In a manner specific to these traditions, Zao developed his abstract painting out of an impulse to perfect the form of the landscape central to his heritage, while de Kooning arrives at the abstract landscape through a desire to do justice to the female form beyond the confines of the nude. Between Zao’s evocation of the sublime in nature and de Kooning’s conception of the landscape as rooted in the body, these artists simultaneously opened and redefined the spectrum of abstract landscape.

As conceived by Zao and de Kooning, the abstract landscape holds a particularly strong topicality in the world of contemporary painting. As other mediums, including sculpture, installation, and video, come to the fore in the current fabrication of artwork, the role of painting is continually called into question. Painting in the 21st century must attempt to overcome the longstanding opposition between figuration and abstraction, in order to bring fresh purpose and relevance to the medium. Such contemporary artists as Charline von Heyl, Albert Oehlen, and Harold Ancart, among others, are addressing this challenge. In the abstract landscapes of Zao and de Kooning, we perhaps discover their antecdents: two models in the compelling search to surpass of the division between the figural and the abstract.

‘Willem de Kooning and Zao Wou-Ki’ is organized and presented in association with Christie’s.

More information: www.levygorvy.com

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos – Future Gallery – Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos

December 10, 2016 – January 28, 2017

Future Gallery
Berlin

Future Gallery presents an exhibition of new works by Spiros Hadjidjanos. Crowd Simulation Breakdown incorporates crowd simulation technology – a technique used in film as a means to create virtual cinematography. This work is Hadjidjanos’ first experiment with the process of simulating the movement of a large number of entities with implicated collective social behavior based on group dynamics. The video exemplifies the breakdown of various simulated scenes in which a crowd runs inexplicably while a densely charged audio plays. Sampling sound from moments after the most fatal suicide attacks of 2016, Hadjidjanos merges in his video work actual audio captured by people’s personal smart phones, or less often, the media. The piece is therefore constructed of actual sourced and artificially generated footage that leads the viewer into a sort of contextualized conflict where reality and authenticity are questioned. Simultaneously, the 3D animation does not intend to deceive; Hadjidjanos’ aim is not to create a high-end film nor a particular narrative but to show the process of doing so. The film compositing techniques are entirely transparent to the viewer, weaving one scene constructed from simulated characters into the next one.

The HD/VR Sculpture–an evolutionary development originating from Hadjidjanos’ Network Sculptures (2010-2016) which incorporates the sine wave form and enables information particles to flow via material connectivity– is a conductor of digital data. It functions as an intermediate input path between two active end-points; the seemingly static bowed legs clandestinely transmit all information that passes from a computer to the destination, a VR headset. The HD/VR sculpture is a spatial portrayal of data in motion, a palpable representation of information we generally perceive as intangible. Donning the headset the viewer is transported to a chimeric virtual space, yet one element remains familiar, for the central virtual subject matter is the sculpture itself, replicated at various scales.

The series of works Taraxacum officinale originate from an image of the German photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch depicting a dandelion seed-head. Hadjidjanos manifests these works, 3D printed in alumide, a derivative of aluminium –the latter developed in the era the particular photograph was taken– and as prints on carbon fibre plates depicting the surface normals, a precise mathematical representation of the orientation of each object’s surface. Using the dimensions of the original photograph to magnify from, with the addition of the third dimension, depth, these works are three-dimensional depth maps of the sourced photograph. By applying forces to these malleable surfaces in a simulated environment, Hadjidjanos transforms their planar surfaces; their form adapts and traces other spatial elements (pedestal, wall, floor). These transformations function as metaphorical reference to the actual plant. The morphology of a Taraxacum officinale seed-head provokes a multitude of associations dealing with transformation.

Spiros Hadjidjanos (*1978, Athens, GR) graduated from Berlin University of the Arts and lives and works in Berlin. This is his third solo exhibition with the gallery. He has had recent exhibitions at venues including: Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Kammerspiele, Munich; Volksbühne, Berlin; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York; Yerba Buena Center of the Arts, San Francisco; CA2M, Madrid; Centre d’Art Bastille, Grenoble.

*The VR/HD Sculpture has been developed in collaboration with Metaphysics VR

More information: www.futuregallery.org

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view - Future Gallery, Berlin

Spiros Hadjidjanos installation view – Future Gallery, Berlin

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Carl Andre – Musée d’Art Moderne – Sculpture as place

Carl Andre

Sculpture as place, 1958 – 2010

Musée d’Art Moderne
Paris

18 October 2016 – 12 February 2017

The Musée d’Art Moderne is presenting a tribute to the major 20th-century American artist Carl Andre (b. 1935 in Quincy, Massachusetts). The exhibition Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010 covers the full spectrum and inner consistency of the Andre oeuvre, with 40 monumental sculptures, numerous poems and photographs, works on paper and various objects that defy pigeonholing. His iconic works appear alongside pieces never shown together before, such as his Dada Forgeries. A leading Minimalist figure together with Donald Judd and Robert Morris, Andre also has links with Conceptualism and Land Art and now stands out as one of the 20th century’s greatest sculptors.

This retrospective reveals how Andre, working with standard, unmodified industrial elements, redefined sculpture as a means for experiencing space, form and matter. He also produced poems that made use of words for their visual as well as their semantic and sound value. The overt simplicity of his work challenges the traditional notions of technique, composition and installation, at the same time as it makes the viewer an active participant.

After arriving in New York in 1957, Andre wrote poetry and made his first, small sculptures. Drawn to the properties of matter – form, weight, texture – in 1965 he began assembling industrial components like wood, metal, bricks and bales of hay in interaction with his exhibition venues. Since then he has continued to respond to gallery, museum and urban spaces: he works with materials he finds on-site, assembles items he can handle on his own, and produces works that combine real presence with a spatial integration so effective that they seem to have been there forever.

In the Andre oeuvre the artwork changes status: it is no longer a symbolic or figurative element, but a real object that is as much a part of the world as a tree or a wall. In the course of the 1960s his notion of sculpture evolved, first as form, then as structure and finally as place: “I have desires,” he told Marta Gnyp in an interview in 2015. “I don’t have ideas. For me it is a physical desire to find the material and a place to work.”

The first Carl Andre exhibition in France for twenty years – the last was at the Musée Cantini in Marseille in 1997 – Sculpture as Place reflects the Musée d’Art Moderne’s policy of taking a fresh look at the great founders of modernity.

Exhibition curators
Sébastien Gokalp, Yasmil Raymond, Philippe Vergne

Designed by the Dia Art Foundation in close collaboration with the artist, this retrospective has already been seen in New York (2014), Madrid (2015) and Berlin (2016), and will subsequently travel to Los Angeles (2017).

More information: www.mam.paris.fr

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris


Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010
Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris


Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010
Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris


Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010
Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris


Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010
Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010 Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris


Exhibition view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as place, 1958-2010
Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Offsite: Khan Lee - Vanouver Art Gallery

Offsite: Khan Lee – Vanouver Art Gallery

Offsite: Khan Lee

November 5, 2016 to April 17, 2017

Vancouver, Canada

Offsite: Khan Lee – Vancouver artist Khan Lee’s Red, Green and Blue is a sculptural installation that uses filtered light to animate nature. Drawing on broad references of horizon lines and landscape art, Lee enables passers-by to visualize the wind.

Building on a sense of theatricality, Lee’s installation acts as an elaborate set comprised of three-dimensional objects that cast larger-than-life shadows against an enormous backdrop. Red, Green and Blue draws viewers into the intersections of artifice and nature within an abundant field of transparent cones fabricated from sheets of hand-folded plastic film. It is both painting and sculpture, using light filtered through red, green and blue lighting gels to project an immersive field of coloured grass-like forms on the architecture of Offsite.

Although an oasis literally refers to the greenery within a desert, it also describes a peaceful location or imagined place where one might escape the rigours of everyday life. Lee’s oasis unfolds into an array of colourful and contemplative possibilities that break up the monotony of grey surroundings.

Khan Lee was born in Seoul, Korea. He studied architecture at Hong-Ik University, before immigrating to Canada to study fine art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Through sculptural and media practices, his work attempts to exhibit results of experimentation with form and process in order to express inherent relationships between material and immaterial content. He is a founding member of the Vancouver-based artist collective Intermission and is presently a member of the Instant Coffee artist collective. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Lee lives and works in Vancouver, BC.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Diana Freundl, Associate Curator, Asian Art. Presented as part of Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures, a triennial exhibition surveying contemporary art in Vancouver presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery from December 3, 2016 to April 17, 2017.

Offsite is funded by the City of Vancouver through the Public Art Program. The Gallery recognizes Ian Gillespie, President, Westbank; Ben Yeung, President, Peterson Investment Group; and the residents of Shangri–La for their support of this space.

Offsite: Khan Lee is the fourteenth installation in the Gallery’s Offsite series.

More information: www.vanartgallery.bc.ca