"Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back" Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017 Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

Douglas Gordon – back and forth and forth and back

Douglas Gordon

back and forth and forth and back

Gagosian
New York

November 14, 2017 – February 3, 2018

If you want to find the truth in something, take it apart piece by piece, then put it back together with the detail of a forensic scientist. This is a classical way to deconstruct a narrative. However, when you stand in front of 24 Hour Psycho (1993) slowly unfolding piece by piece, after five minutes, you’ve lost track of where the narrative started. I like this idea that you can take almost a scientific method and end up lost in a labyrinth of multiple, conflicting meanings, and that you have to acknowledge your own forgetfulness.
—Douglas Gordon

Gagosian is pleased to present “back and forth and forth and back,” an exhibition of key films and videos by Douglas Gordon, including 24 Hour Psycho Back and Forth and To and Fro (2008), as well as a selection of video monitor works.

In his projections, installations, photographs, text works, performances, and more, Gordon investigates collective memory and selfhood, whether divided, fragmented, or dissolved altogether. His interest in temporal manipulation is especially evident in his films and videos; using his own work and that of others as raw material, he distorts time in order to disorient and challenge.

For 24 Hour Psycho Back and Forth and To and Fro (2008), Gordon exacerbates the already unsettling plot of Alfred Hitchcock’s iconic thriller Psycho (1960) by allowing time to flow forward and backward at the same time. While Gordon’s earlier 24 Hour Psycho (1993) slowed down Hitchcock’s original to a few frames per second, extending the duration of the film to 24 hours, 24 Hour Psycho Back and Forth and To and Fro introduces an additional layer of distortion. The film plays on two adjoining screens: on one, the film starts from the beginning, and on the other it starts from the end, so that for an unbearably brief moment (one twenty-fourth of a second), after waiting for twelve hours, the screens show the same sequence, the mirrored images resembling a giant, slow-moving Rorschach test.

Using edited footage as a malleable resource, Douglas Gordon sets up new definitions of suspense and climax. Rather than waiting for Janet Leigh’s killer to appear in silhouette, knife in hand, behind her, viewers of Gordon’s film enter a hypnotic and photographic spectacle with the hope of simply catching the split second when two temporal directions overlap.

More information: gagosian.com

"Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back" Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017 Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

“Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back”
Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York
Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

"Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back" Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017 Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

“Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back”
Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York
Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

"Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back" Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017 Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

“Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back”
Installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York
Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios

Masks Installation view Artwork © 2017 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by Rob McKeever

John Chamberlain – Masks – Gagosian NY

John Chamberlain

Masks

September 19 – October 28, 2017

Gagosian
New York

Let the insanity play itself out through the materials. Then you don’t have to worry about style. You’ll just be working to describe your own insanity.
—John Chamberlain

Gagosian NY presents a selection of rarely seen sculptures by artist John Chamberlain. Following the New York showings of “New Sculpture” at Gagosian in 2011, as well as “Choices,” his 2012 retrospective at the Guggenheim, the current exhibition highlights a series of steel masks, the majority of which are on view for the first time since their creation in the 1990s, as well as abstract wall sculptures made between the 1970s and 2000s.

Best known during his lifetime for his distinctive metal sculptures, often made of crushed and torqued automobile steel, Chamberlain used the detritus of American industry to create works that contain the bold energy of Abstract Expressionism, the pre-manufactured elements of Pop and Minimalism, and even the provocative curves and swells of the High Baroque. His multidimensional collages of foam, steel, or aluminum—from large floor sculptures to more intimate, interlocking arrangements—express an unwavering elegance, exuding both the strength and the fragility of everyday materials.

From the beginning of his career, Chamberlain emphasized the primary role of abstraction in his work. In 1991, he turned to a more recognizable form: the mask. Assembling intricately cut, painted metal parts, he made his first mask, A Good Head and a Half (1991), for a benefit auction for Victim Services, providing aid to victims of sexual assault. He continued to produce masks throughout the 1990s in his studio on Shelter Island, titling many of them with opus numbers—as in Opus 16 (1998) and Opus 90 (1998)—thus aligning their visual dynamism with the various synchronized elements of a musical composition. Similar to the Tonk sculptures that precede them, which were made of disassembled toy trucks gathered from an abandoned Tonka Toy factory in 1981, the masks possess a vibrant, lyrical innocence, with their overlapping strips and shards of metal, as well as nails, used to evoke hair, beards, eyebrows, teeth, and crowns.

Complex relationships between color, texture, and form are found in both the masks and the wall sculptures. Cum Two Me (1977) is a multicolored mass of curved and conjoined steel scraps, combining raw, rusty edges with straight lines, and spray-paint drips with polished chrome. These juxtapositions are echoed in THE MASK OF PERSISTENCE (1996), with its protruding tongue and spirals of hair, which emerge from behind leaf-like planes of white and red. In Rebel Ruckus (1975), the twists and folds of the metal resemble crumpled paper in hues of pink, green, yellow, and blue. With its various ridges and cast shadows, the abstract sculpture tempts a search for the contours of a face, yet remains undefinable, exemplifying the subtle anthropomorphism of Chamberlain’s abstraction. This ambiguity can be found in the masks as well; though they are representational in nature, they too are comprised of interconnected abstract units.

John Chamberlain was born in Rochester, Indiana in 1927, and died in New York in 2011. Collections include Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Dia: Beacon, NY; Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX; Menil Collection, Houston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); Museo Jumex, Mexico City; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Museum für Moderne Kunst (MMK), Frankfurt; Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig (mumok), Vienna; Berardo Museum, Lisbon; and Tate, London. His first retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1971) was followed by more than one hundred solo exhibitions, including “John Chamberlain: Sculpture, An Extended Exhibition,” Dia Art Foundation (1982–85); “John Chamberlain: Sculpture, 1954–1985,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1986); “John Chamberlain,” Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden (1991); “John Chamberlain: Sculpture,” Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1996); “John Chamberlain: Foam sculptures (1966–79); Photographs (1989–2004),” Chinati Foundation, Marfa (2005–06); and “John Chamberlain: American Tableau,” Menil Collection, Houston (2009). A second retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, “Choices,” took place in 2012. Other recent exhibitions include “John Chamberlain: It Ain’t Cheap,” Dan Flavin Art Institute, Dia Art Foundation, Bridgehampton, NY (2014); and “John Chamberlain,” Inverleith House and Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (2015).

“John Chamberlain: Foils,” an outdoor installation of two monumental aluminum foil sculptures, is on view at LongHouse Reserve, East Hampton, NY, through October 2018.

More information: gagosian.com

Masks Installation view Artwork © 2017 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by Rob McKeever

Masks
Installation view
Artwork © 2017 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Photo by Rob McKeever

John Chamberlain, Opus 16, 1998, © 2017 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever.

John Chamberlain, Opus 16, 1998, © 2017 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever.

Ed Ruscha Wazza Problm?, 1981 pastel on paper 23 × 29 inches (58.4 × 73.7 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha – Custom-built Intrigue: Drawings 1974-1984

Ed Ruscha

CUSTOM-BUILT INTRIGUE: DRAWINGS 1974–1984

MAY 6 – JUNE 30, 2017

Gagosian presents “Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984,” an exhibition of key text drawings by Ed Ruscha. Many of these historical gems have been brought together thanks to generous loans from private and institutional collections.

Throughout decades of formal experimentation, Ruscha has explored the role of language in painting, drawing, photography, printmaking, and bookmaking through a singular, sometimes oblique use of words. From the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s, he honed his distinctive drawing practice to create some of the most compelling works of his career. The text drawings from this period, exquisitely rendered in pastel, dry pigment, and various edible substances, from spinach to carrot juice, bridge the spirited Pop art for which Ruscha first gained renown with the cerebral Conceptualism to which his work was essential.

The exhibition features a decade of drawings (1974–1984) towards the end of which Ruscha reintroduces the element of imagery. With the inclusion of one work on paper from 1986, we can see a clear shift to another stage of his drawing practice.

Drawing has long been considered the most direct process by which thought is transferred into image; but Ruscha almost completely conceptualizes his images prior to making them. Using a reverse-stenciling graphic technique, Ruscha cuts out stencils in the shape of letters and places them on paper. He then applies pigment around the covered area with unconventional tools, such as cotton puffs and Q-Tips, to create his typography utilizing negative space rather than line. Selectively trawling words and phrases from the American vernacular, with little regard to their prescribed meaning or intention, Ruscha subverts the symbolic system of language altogether. Words and phrases severed from specific time, location, or context resonate with just as much vitality and pathos as when the drawings were created.

Custom-Built Intrigue (1981) combines vibrant colors and dynamic lingo with a flare of California cool, fusing the mythic cars of Los Angeles hot-rod culture (custom-built) with the complex plots of the silver screen (intrigue). In this drawing, Ruscha additionally describes his own creative process of combining words as reusable parts, producing a complex and enigmatic composite of meanings. In two drawings from 1976, Find Contact Lens at Bottom of Swimming Pool and Thick Blocks of Musical Fudge, richly sensorial words emerge from almost palpable hues. Find Contact Lens at Bottom of Swimming Pool evocatively describes a nearly impossible task: the dappled aquamarine surface conjures sunlight striking water, beneath which the missing contact lens supposedly lurks. Thick Blocks of Musical Fudge exemplifies Ruscha’s formal and linguistic mastery, whereby sound and taste are conflated in a sumptuous synesthetic experience. The words coax the textures and smells of rich confectionery out of the deep brown pastel ground. He Enjoys the Co. of Women is classic Ruscha; its droll use of colloquial and abbreviated language creates an open narrative with an economy of means.

Ruscha’s protean drawings have a renewed potency in an era when talking heads, internet memes, and 140-character tweets corrode and constrict social channels of imagination, communication, and interpretation.

More information: www.gagosian.com

"Ed Ruscha: Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984” Installation view Artworks © Ed Ruscha Photo by Rob McKeever

“Ed Ruscha: Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984”
Installation view
Artworks © Ed Ruscha
Photo by Rob McKeever

"Ed Ruscha: Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984” Installation view Artworks © Ed Ruscha Photo by Rob McKeever

“Ed Ruscha: Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984”
Installation view
Artworks © Ed Ruscha
Photo by Rob McKeever

Ed Ruscha Pr-Pr-Process Food, 1976 Pastel on paper 23 1/8 × 29 1/8 inches (58.7 × 74 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha
Pr-Pr-Process Food, 1976
Pastel on paper
23 1/8 × 29 1/8 inches (58.7 × 74 cm)
© Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha He Enjoys the Co. of Women, 1976 Pastel on paper 22 1/2 × 28 1/2 inches (57.2 × 72.4 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha
He Enjoys the Co. of Women, 1976
Pastel on paper
22 1/2 × 28 1/2 inches (57.2 × 72.4 cm)
© Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha Custom-Built Intrigue, 1981 Pastel on Paper 23 × 29 inches (58.4 × 73.7 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha
Custom-Built Intrigue, 1981
Pastel on Paper
23 × 29 inches (58.4 × 73.7 cm)
© Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today, 1977 Pastel on paper 22 5/8 × 28 5/8 inches (57.5 × 72.7 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha
Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today, 1977
Pastel on paper
22 5/8 × 28 5/8 inches (57.5 × 72.7 cm)
© Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha Wazza Problm?, 1981 pastel on paper 23 × 29 inches (58.4 × 73.7 cm) © Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha
Wazza Problm?, 1981
pastel on paper
23 × 29 inches (58.4 × 73.7 cm)
© Ed Ruscha

Feature: Sunday Painter | Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz

German Neo-Expressionist painting, Georg Baselitz (zʇᴉlǝsɐq ƃɹoǝפ) is this week’s #SundayPainter.

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In the 1960s, Georg Baselitz emerged as a pioneer of German Neo-Expressionist painting. His work evokes disquieting subjects rendered feverishly as a means of confronting the realities of the
modern age and explores what it is to be German and a German artist in a
postwar world. In the late 1970s his iconic “upside-down” paintings, in
which bodies, landscapes, and buildings are inverted within the picture
plane, ignoring the realities of the physical world, make obvious the
artifice of painting. Drawing upon a dynamic and myriad pool of
influences, including art of the Mannerist period, African sculptures,
and Soviet era illustration art, Baselitz developed a distinct painting
language.

Georg Baselitz (b. 1938, Deutschbaselitz, Saxony) lives and works near
Munich, Germany and in Imperia, Italy. Public collections include Museum
Ludwig, Cologne; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of
Art, New York; and Tate Modern, London. Major museum exhibitions
include Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1995, traveled to Los
Angeles County Museum of Art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden,
Washington, D.C., and Nationalgalerie, Berlin); “Aquarelles
Monumentales,” Albertina, Vienna (2003); Royal Academy of Arts, London
(2007, traveled to MADRE, Naples, through 2008); “Prints: 1964 to 1983,”
Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich (2008); Galleria Borghese, Rome (2011);
Pinacoteca, São Paulo, Brazil (2011); “Baselitz as Sculptor,” Musée
d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2011–12); Essl Museum, Vienna
(2013); Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2013); Guggenheim Museum
Bilbao, Spain (2013); and “Georg Baselitz: Remix,” Albertina, Vienna
(2014). A major survey of Baselitz’s paintings and sculpture is on view
at Haus der Kunst, Munich through February 1, 2015.

 

( http://www.gagosian.com/artists/georg-baselitz  )

News: Gagosian | Jean-Michel Basquiat Catalogue

Gagosian have released this beautiful catalogue from the “Jean-Michel Basquiat” exhibition at Gagosian Gallery West 24th Street, New York in 2013. 

Available here: http://www.gagosian.com/shop/jean-michel-basquiat—catalogue—ggicmsjbasq03

Texts by Robert Farris Thompson and Rene Ricard

10 1/2 x 12 1/4 inches (26.7 x 31.1 cm); 210 pages; Fully illustrated

Designed by Goto Design, New York; Printed by The Avery Group at Shapco Printing, Minneapolis; Distributed by Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., in association with Gagosian Gallery

Richard Serra show extended dates

Gagosian, London

Excellent news, Gagosian London have extended the Richard Serra show at the Britannia Street gallery.  Get down there until 4 March 2015.

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Gagosian London is pleased to present recent work by Richard Serra.

The Gagosian Gallery on Britannia Street will exhibit four large-scale steel sculptures:

Backdoor Pipeline (2010)

Ramble (2014)

Dead Load (2014)

London Cross (2014)

Richard Serra was born in San Francisco in 1938. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and

Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He has lived in New York since 1966. His first solo exhibitions were

held at Galleria La Salita, Rome (1966), and at the Leo Castelli Warehouse, New York (1969). His first solo

museum exhibition was presented at Pasadena Art Museum (1970). Serra has since participated in several

Documenta exhibitions (Kassel, 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1987), and in the Venice Biennales of 1980, 1984,

2001, and 2013. Serra’s work has been shown in numerous solo museum exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum,

Amsterdam (1977); Centre Pompidou, Paris (1984); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1986 and 2007); and

other museums in Europe, the U.S., and Latin America. In 2005, eight large-scale works were permanently

installed at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. A traveling survey of Serra’s drawings was on view in 2011–12 at

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Menil Collection,

Houston. In April 2014, Serra installed a major permanent landscape sculpture in the desert of the Brouq

Nature Reserve in western Qatar. 

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http://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/richard-serra—october-11-2014 )

Raiders | Harmony Korine | Gagosian Beverley Hills

We always look forward to seeing new artwork by cult film maker Harmony Korine, who has a show in the new year at Gagosian Beverley Hills.

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Gagosian Beverly Hills is pleased to present new paintings by Harmony Korine.

Korine’s cult films of the past twenty years—from the surreal Gummo (1997) to Spring Breakers (2012), a contemporary film noir in which four college freshwomen are drawn into a murderous labyrinth of events—merge reality with fiction and hand-held camerawork with precise montage. This heady mix of the unplanned, the seductive, and the outlandish crystallizes in his lesser known, highly tactile paintings. Eschewing brush and professional paint in favor of Squeegees, leftover household paint, and masking tape, he creates loosely sequential images that echo the sonic and visual leitmotifs of his films. The accumulative hypnotic effect of the paintings is offset by lifelike randomness and impulsive energy.

To create Raider Burst (2014), Korine stuck overlapping segments of masking tape to the center of an unprimed canvas, then used a broom to spread primary red, yellow, and blue dyes over the surface. He then removed the tape to reveal bright, irregular stars shining through colorful mists; the final composition is characterized by a spontaneous, explosive radiance. Other paintings are inhabited by shadowy, clawed creatures reminiscent of Goya’s ghastly Caprices, obscured by layers of housepaint, sprayed with letters, and repainted over the course of several years.

Canvases covered in rows of painted circles and squares yield sudden variations that vacillate between considered and spontaneous mark-making, while rainbow-hued, striated paintings comprising hundreds of horizontal lines hint at distant perspectives. Korine sticks pieces of bubble wrap, plastic, and paper to the canvas as he works, imbuing the optical depths with physical relief. These fossilized scraps embody dual narratives: as literal records of process, their skeletal silhouettes also suggest drifting specters, echoing the animated wraiths of more overtly figurative works such as Little Shawshank and W. Hulk Felix. Deliberate and erratic, repetitious and random, Korine’s paintings are born of fierce life forces, conflictual yet interdependent.

Harmony Korine was born in Bolinas, California in 1973. His films include Kids (1995, written by Korine, directed by Larry Clark); Gummo (1997, written and directed by Korine); Julien Donkey-Boy (1999, written and directed by Korine); Ken Park (2002, written by Korine, directed by Larry Clark and Ed Lachman); Mister Lonely (2007, written by Korine, co-directed with Avi Korine); Trash Humpers (2009, written and directed by Korine); and Spring Breakers (2012, written and directed by Korine). Solo and two-person exhibitions of his films, photographs, and paintings include Patrick Painter, Santa Monica, CA (1997, 2000); Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent, Belgium (2000); “Harmony Korine-pigxote,” Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery, Nashville, TN (2009); “Rita Ackermann and Harmony Korine: Shadow Fux,” Swiss Institute, New York (2010–11); and Gagosian New York (2014). His work was included in “Présumés Innocents, l’art contemporain et l’enfance,” CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (2001); “Beautiful Losers,” Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center (2004); “SONIC YOUTH etc. : SENSATIONAL FIX,” Kunsthalle Düsseldorf (2009); and “Altars of Madness,” Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art contemporain (2013). Korine’s novel, A Crack Up at the Race Riots, was published by Mainstreet/Doubleday in 1998. Pass the Bitch Chicken: Christopher Wool & Harmony Korine, a book of collaborative images, was released by Holzwarth Publications in 2002. His work was included in the 50th Venice Biennale (2003).

Gagosian will also present an exhibition of recent paintings by Korine at Eden Rock, St. Barths from December 28, 2014–January 31, 2015.

Korine lives and works in Nashville, TN.

( http://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/harmony-korine—january-10-2015 )

Takashi Murakami | In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow

November 10, 2014 – January 17, 2015 | Takashi Murakami | Gagosian NY

New work from Takashi Murakami in a new exhibition at Gagosian NY opens tonight.

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Opening reception: Monday, November 10th, from 6:00 to 8:00pmTo me, religions are a narrative…Natural catastrophes, earthquakes, are things caused by nature. Such chaos isnatural, but we have to make sense of it somehow, and so we had to invent these stories. That is what I wantedto paint.—Takashi MurakamiGagosian New York is pleased to announce“In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow,” a majorexhibition of new paintings andsculptures by Takashi Murakami.A lightning rod of cultural dichotomies (high/low, ancient/modern, oriental/occidental), Murakami believes theartist to be one who perceives and limns the bordersbetween worlds. Combining classical techniques with thelatest technologies, he moves freely within an ever-expanding field of aesthetic issuesand cultural inspirations.Parallel to the dystopian themes that pervade his work, he recollects and revitalizes traditional narratives oftranscendence and enlightenment, often involving outsider-savants. Mining religious and secular subjectsfavored by the so-called Japanese “eccentrics” or non-conformist artists of the Early Modern era commonlyconsidered to be counterparts of the Western Romantic tradition, Murakami situates himself within their legacyof bold and lively individualism in a manner that is entirely his own and of his time.Since the devastating Great Tōhoku Earthquake of 2011, Murakami has explored Japanese art produced inresponse to historic natural disasters. For example, in the aftermath of the Great Asei Edo Earthquake of 1855,painters such as Kano Kazunobu portrayed the five hundredarhats(orrakan), the spiritual protectors of theBuddha’s teachings, as stewards of enlightenment in dire times. While Kazunobu employed diverse Eastern andWestern techniques in his vastscroll paintings, Murakami has created an immersive installation, entered througha 56-ton replica of asanmon(sacred gate), of eclecticarhats; deliquescing clones of his fictional creature Mr.Dob; andkarajishi, the mythic lions that guard Japanese Buddhist temples. Here isa contemporary beliefsystem, constructed in the wake of disaster, that merges earlier faiths, myths, and images into a syncreticspirituality of the artist’s imagination. In totemic sculptures representingdemons, religious sites, and self-portraits; and paintings that conflateclassical Japanese techniques withAbstract Expressionist tropes, science-fiction, manga, and Buddhist and Shinto imagery, Murakami investigates the role of faith amid the inexorabletransience and trauma of existence.

( http://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/takashi-murakami—november-10-2014 )

Helen Frankenthaler: Composing with Color: Paintings 1962–1963

Elizabeth Smith book signing & talk at Gagosian Shop, New York

In NYC tonight?  have a book signing and talk on our  this week, Helen Frankenthaler: 

Michael Craig-Martin | Gagosian Hong Kong

Hong Kong | June 12 – August 16, 2014

I started making drawings of ordinary objects, one at a time, in 1977. I drew them on A4 paper with a pencil and then traced them in very fine tape onto acetate to remove all trace of their being handmade. I had no idea where they might take me, and it would have been inconceivable to me that they would remain at the center of my work to this day. I intended them to be “styleless,” but over the years the way they look has come to be recognizable as my style.
—Michael Craig-Martin

Gagosian Hong Kong is pleased to present recent paintings by Michael Craig-Martin.

A principal figure of British conceptual art, Craig-Martin probes the relationship between objects and images, harnessing the human capacity to imagine absent forms through symbols and pictures. The perceptual tension between object, representation, and language has been his central concern over the past four decades. During the late 1970s, he began to transcribe everyday items into “pictorial readymades” directly onto gallery walls, and since the 1990s onto canvas in conjunction with vivid artificial color. His drawings, paintings, and monumental steel sculptures are representations in the truest sense of the word, conveying familiar subjects as concisely as possible and thereby inviting each viewer’s personal response.

Recent paintings on aluminum panels, some larger than two meters square, depict a new range of contemporary objects—a high-heeled shoe, a disposable coffee cup, an energy-saving lightbulb—in an electric palette tinged with neon blues, greens, and pinks. The simplest object can become iconic. The amplified archetypes may lure the viewer into associations with his or her own corkscrew, headphones, or prescription pills. Continuing to resist any elaboration of form, Craig-Martin allows himself absolute chromatic freedom, casting the line-drawn silhouettes—which he draws digitally, then executes using paint rollers and thin tape—against vivid backgrounds of turquoise or purple. The selected colors disrupt the usual identity of the explicitly described objects, as in a subtly self-referential painting of a standard paint roller suspended in a magenta picture plane. “The drawings are as precisely like the thing as I can make them, and the color is as artificial as I can make it,” Craig-Martin has said. In this way, he uses color to “subvert” the image.

Influenced by the color theory of Josef Albers—and realizing a congruous visual ambiguity in his specific approach to representation—Craig-Martin continuously explores how color affects perception. A series of black canvases, exhibited first at Kunstmuseen Krefeld in 2013, isolates his enduring subjects. Untitled (briefcase) (2012) depicts a red briefcase with green catches, complimentary colors that push the quotidian image into the foreground. Conversely, in Untitled (soupcan profile) (2013)—an oblique homage to Andy Warhol—the lower half of the can matches the black background, causing it to disappear; the remaining image is a reductivist trace of a soup can comprising a blue square, a green circle, and four orange and blue lines. Expanding upon his signature generalization of the object, Craig-Martin negates it to bring color and form into perfect balance.

Michael Craig-Martin was born in Dublin in 1941, and studied at Yale University, New Haven from 1963 to 1966. He was a professor at Goldsmith’s College, London from 1974–88 and 1994–2000, where he was a significant influence on emerging British artists. Craig-Martin’s work is represented in public collections worldwide, including Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate, London; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid. Permanent large-scale installations are on view at Laban Dance Center, London and European Investment Bank, Luxembourg. Solo museum exhibitions include “Always Now,” Kunstverein Hannover (1998); IVAM, Valencia (2000); “Living,” Sintra Museum of Modern Art, Portugal (2001); “Signs of Life,” Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2006); and “Less Is Still More,” Museum Haus Esters, Krefeld, Germany (2013). Retrospectives include Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (1989); and Irish Museum of Modern Art (2006–07). Craig-Martin lives and works in London.

“Michael Craig-Martin at Chatsworth,” an installation of large-scale steel sculpture, is on view at Chatsworth House, Derbyshire through June 29, 2014. A major exhibition of recent work by Craig-Martin will be presented at Himalayas Museum, Shanghai from January 30–March 30, 2015.

For further information please contact the gallery at [email protected] or at +852.2151.0555. All images are subject to copyright. Gallery approval must be granted prior to reproduction.

Please join the conversation with Gagosian Gallery on Twitter (@GagosianAsia), Facebook (@GagosianGallery), Google+ (@Gagosian Gallery), Instagram (@gagosiangallery), and Tumblr (@GagosianGallery) via the hashtag #MichaelCraigMartin.

More: ( http://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/michael-craig-martin—june-12-2014 )

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開幕酒會: 6月12曰(星期四)晚上6時到8時

我在1977年開始繪畫日常物品,每一幅畫一件物品。我先用鉛筆在A4紙上繪畫草稿,然後用非常幼細的膠帶臨摹到醋酸膠片上,去除一切手繪的痕跡。當時我不知道效果會如何,更沒想過至今仍是我創作的重點。我的原意是令作品「沒有風格」,但多年來它們卻成為我的風格。
—米高•克雷格-马丁

香港高古軒畫廊欣然呈獻米高•克雷格-馬丁的近期畫作。

米高為英國概念藝術的領軍人物,他喜愛探索物件與影像之間的關係,擅長從符號及圖畫 中構思出虛無的形態。四十多年來,他一直醉心於物件、表現與語言之間的張力。於1970年代後期,他開始將日常物品化成「現成圖像」,直接繪於藝廊的牆 上,並由1990年代起改用畫布,並配以鮮艷的人工色彩。他的繪畫、油畫及大型鋼雕塑皆為名副其實的表現作品,極度簡潔地重現常見之物,令觀賞者有不同的 個人感受。

他近期的鋁板畫部分超過2平方米,以一系列當代物件為題材,包括高跟鞋、即棄咖啡杯 及慳電膽,並配上螢光藍、綠和粉紅等奪目色彩,證明最簡單的物件也能充滿標誌性。放大的物品引導觀賞者聯想起家中的開瓶器、耳筒或藥丸。克雷格-馬丁秉承 多年來的原則,拒絕刻劃細節,用色大膽放任,先用電腦勾勒物品的輪廓,再用幼膠紙及以油轆上色,背景則為鮮艷的湖水綠或紫色。他的用色改變了物品平常的特 性,例如其中一幅以紫紅色背景襯托的油轆作品,便充滿自我參照的意味。克雷格-馬丁表示:「我力求繪圖跟實物無異,並盡量令顏色極度人工化。」反映他利用 色彩顛覆圖像。

克雷格-馬丁受約瑟夫‧亞伯斯(Josef Albers)的色彩理論影響,並自覺其表現手法帶有相同的視覺歧義性,於是不斷探索色彩對感知的影響。他於2013年首次在德國克雷費爾德藝術博物館展 出的黑色油畫系列,突顯了其常用的題材。《無題(公事包)》(Untitled (briefcase))(2012年)描繪附有綠色扣鎖的紅色公事包,透過互補色突出日常物品。相反,在間接向安迪‧沃荷致敬的《無題(罐頭湯平面 像)》(Untitled (soupcan profile))(2013年)中,罐頭的下半部融入黑色的背景中;畫面的其餘部份則運用簡化主義手法,以一個藍色正方形、綠色圓形和四條橙色與藍色線 組成一個罐頭湯。克雷格-馬丁進一步演繹他標誌性的物品概括化手法,透過除去物品的特點,達致顏色與形態的完美平衡。

米高‧克雷格-馬丁1941年生於都柏林,1963至1966年入讀耶魯大學。他在1974至1988年及1994 年至2000年期間在倫敦金史密斯學院任教,對新晉英國藝術家影響深遠。其作品獲世界各地多間公共博物館收藏,包括紐約現代藝術博物館、倫敦泰特美術館、 巴黎龐畢度中心及馬德里索菲亞王后國家藝術中心博物館,其大型藝術裝置亦常設於倫敦拉邦舞蹈中心(Laban Dance Center)及盧森堡歐洲投資銀行。克雷格-馬丁曾於博物館舉辦的個展包括「Always Now」(漢諾威藝術協會,1998年;瓦倫西亞現代藝術館,2000年)、「Living」(葡萄牙辛特拉現代藝術博物館,2001年)、「Signs of Life」(奧地利布雷根茨美術館,2006年)及「Less Is Still More」(德國克雷費爾德藝術博物館愛思特館,2013年),並曾於倫敦Whitechapel Art Gallery(1989年)及愛爾蘭現代藝術博物館舉辦回顧展(2006至2007年)。克雷格-馬丁現於倫敦定居及工作。

大型鋼雕塑裝置《Michael Craig-Martin at Chatsworth》現於英國達比郡查茲沃斯莊園(Chatsworth House)展出,展期至2014年6月29日。展出克雷格-馬丁近作的大型展覽將於2015年1月30日至3月30日期間於上海喜瑪拉雅美術館展出。

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