Shelagh Keeley Notes on Obsolescence, 2014 acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Persistence group exhibition – Vancouver Art Gallery

Persistence

Vancouver Art Gallery
Canada

June 24 to October 1, 2017

Persistence draws together three recent contemporary installations by Canadian artists to explore the surprising and creative ways that technologies, physical objects and natural processes endure and transform. Featuring recently acquired works from the collection presented for the first time at the Gallery, the exhibition’s premise is inspired by media critic Marshall McLuhan’s ideas concerning the role of obsolescence in sparking creativity and the invention of new order. McLuhan’s writing is referenced in the title of Toronto-based Shelagh Keeley’s Notes on Obsolescence (2014), a large-scale multimedia wall work that prompts references to technological and capitalist cycles. The exhibition also present a collaborative installation by Vancouver-based artists Julia Feyrer and Tamara Henderson. Invoking theatre, play, myth and ritual, The Last Waves: Laboratory (2016) recycles and animates various found and fabricated objects in a capricious, sometimes disorienting response to materials. Vancouver artist Germaine Koh’s Fair-weather forces (water level) (2008) also recasts the familiar in unpredictable ways. Koh’s minimalist sculpture features a row of stanchions with velvet ropes that rise and fall in response to tidal levels, dramatizing the persistence of nature’s processes and their profound ability to shape and regulate our lives. Each of these three works raises insightful propositions about perseverance, especially during this time of social and political upheavals.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Daina Augaitis, Chief Curator/Associate Director.

Generously supported by:
Michael O’Brian Family Foundation

More information: vanartgallery.bc.ca

Shelagh Keeley Notes on Obsolescence, 2014 acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid - Persistence, Vancouver Art Gallery

Shelagh Keeley
Notes on Obsolescence, 2014
acrylic paint, collage elements, crayon, graphite, oil stick, photograph on paper and plastic film
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Anonymous Gift
Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Seung-taek Lee Godret Stone 1958 Stones, rope, wood

Seung-taek Lee – Lévy Gorvy, New York

Seung-taek Lee

March 15 – April 22, 2017

Lévy Gorvy
New York City

New York’s Lévy Gorvy has announced an exhibition of Korean artist Seung-taek Lee (b. 1932). Presented in collaboration with the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, this marks the first solo exhibition of Lee’s work in the United States. Lee’s experimental practice holds an influential place in the history of Korean art. Throughout his six-decade career, he has continually challenged traditional notions of identity and history, forging new paths for the artistic expression of nature, philosophy, and spatial experience.

This exhibition will celebrate Lévy Gorvy’s representation of Lee with 40 works spanning the late 1950s to the present day. These include his 1960 Non-Sculpture, recently on view at Haus der Kunst, Munich; photographs from his 1971 performance, Wind-Folk Amusement; and several Wind paintings from the 1960s through the present wherein curving lengths of rope give shape to the ephemeral movements of air. A fully illustrated catalogue featuring an interview of the artist by Hans-Ulrich Obrist, an essay by curator and scholar Hui Kyung An, and a specially commissioned poem by Mónica De La Torre will accompany the exhibition.

A solitary figure unbound by the strictures of any movement or group, Lee moves between the material and the metaphysical. Privileging no single medium, his oeuvre spans several, incorporating aspects of painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, and performance, often within the same piece. Notions of negation—which he alternately refers to as “dematerialization,” “anti-concept,” and “non-sculpture”—structure his approach, by which he transforms ordinary objects, imbuing them with multiple meanings and affects. Embracing invisible forces and unorthodox materials such as tree branches, wire, stones, human hair, fabric, and rope, his art elevates the mundane to the level of myth. At once emphatically abstract and culturally specific, it draws on the subtle, unassuming beauty of Korean aesthetic traditions and folk art. Rooted in a concrete poetics of place, it reflects contemporaneous developments in Earth Art, Mono-ha, and Post-Minimalism while maintaining resolute independence from its peer groups.

In 1958, Lee began his Godret Stone series, whose title alludes to the small stones used by Korean artisans to weight traditional mats while weaving. Grooved and hung from wooden bars with rope, the stones appear to float, thus belying their solid physicality. Such suspensions of expectation are typical of Lee’s practice, which lingers on the discrepancies between appearance and reality. Beginning in the late 1960s, he turned to the representation of immaterial phenomena in nature such as wind, fire, water, smoke, and fog. His fascination with the extra-physical led him to understand the artist’s task as “connecting different worlds in search of another realm,” as he aptly described.

Seung-taek Lee’s work resides in the permanent collections of museums and institutions worldwide, including the Tate Modern, London; the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea, Seoul; and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney. Solo exhibitions of Lee’s work have been held at the Sungkok Art Museum in Seoul and the Nam June Paik Art Center in Yongin. He received the Nam June Paik Art Center Prize in 2009 and the Eungwan Order of Cultural Merit from the Korean Ministry of Culture in 2014.

More information: www.levygorvy.com

Seung-taek Lee Godret Stone 1958 Stones, rope, wood

Seung-taek Lee
Godret Stone
1958
Stones, rope, wood

Seung-taek Lee Tied Knife 1962 Knife, rope

Seung-taek Lee
Tied Knife
1962
Knife, rope

Seung-taek Lee Non-Sculpture 1960 Ink on paper, rope, and wood

Seung-taek Lee
Non-Sculpture
1960
Ink on paper, rope, and wood

Seung-taek Lee - Installation View - Lévy Gorvy

Seung-taek Lee – Installation View – Lévy Gorvy

Seung-taek Lee Untitled 2016 Rope on colored canvas

Seung-taek Lee
Untitled
2016
Rope on colored canvas

Sebastian Kite - We will meet in the place where there is no darkness - South Kiosk

Sebastian Kite exhibition – South Kiosk

Sebastian Kite

“We will meet in the place where there is no darkness”

10 February – 04 March 2017 Opening hours: Thurs-Sat, 12-6pm
South Kiosk
London

In George Orwell’s dystopian classic 1984, the author makes reference to a place where there is no darkness. A place, our lead protagonist Winston Smith believes to be free from the oppression of the totalitarian state under which he lives. Deceived to visit this place by the state Police, Smith instead finds himself under the glaring lights of an interrogation cell, permanently lit to aid his state of torture.

For We will meet in the place where there is no darkness artist Sebastian Kite has created a site-specific installation exploring the relationship between space, light and sound. Constructed as a pavilion within the gallery space, Kite’s work references back to Orwell’s interrogation room using light as a material to create an ever-evolving space. Constructed from a series of half-toned panels that suggest static or white noise, the space is further cut through it’s horizontal with a two-way mirror referencing the voyeurism, narcissism and sublimity at the heart of the interrogation process. Spatialised sound further acts to reinforce the dynamic while also dividing the space into four distinct areas.

Introduced into this space, a dancer acts as a protagonist, with each performance redefining the relationship between the architecture and the audio-visual score and composition. Held once a week live in the space, performances create a generative interplay of media creating an ever-evolving space over the lifetime of the exhibition.

Sebastian Kite (b. 1986) is an installation artist and architect based in London. Kite creates experiential environments to choreograph the sensory engagement of people with architectural spaces. His practice lies at the intersection of art and architecture, with a particular focus on site-specificity. Beginning with an analysis of the site, Kite’s installations use structure, kinetics, light, performance, projection and sound as strategies to illustrate new readings of spaces.

Kite graduated as an architect in 2010 (Glasgow School of Art, Westminster School of Architecture) and also has a background in music. Kite has exhibited work in both Europe and the US and is co-founder of Kite & Laslett studio, he also currently works as lead architect and designer at London-based design agency Jotta Studio. Notable works include Hue that toured Sweden, Berlin and London (2015) and AA (2015).

Performances
February: Thurs 9 (6-9pm), Sat 11 (2-4pm), Sat 18 (12-2pm), Sat 25 (2-4pm), March: Sat 4 (2-4pm)

More information: www.southkiosk.com

Introducing: Gabriel Dawe | Installation Art

Beautiful textile installation artworks from Mexican artist Gabriel Dawe

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Originally from Mexico City, Gabriel Dawe creates site-specific installations that explore the connection between fashion and
architecture, and how they relate to the human need for shelter in all
its shapes and forms. His work is centered in the exploration of
textiles, aiming to examine the complicated construction of gender and
identity in his native Mexico and attempting to subvert the notions of
masculinity and machismo prevalent in the present day. His work has been
exhibited in the US, Canada, Belgium, and the UK. After living in
Montreal, Canada for 7 years, he moved to Dallas, Texas, where he
obtained his MFA at the University of Texas at Dallas. For the final two
years of his degree, he was an artist in residence at CentralTrak, the
Artist in Residency program at UTD. His work has been featured in
numerous publications around the world, including Sculpture magazine,
the cover of the 12th edition of Art Fundamentals published by
McGraw-Hill, and in author Tristan Manco’s book Raw + Material = Art .
He is represented by Conduit Gallery in Dallas, and by Lot 10 Gallery in
Brussels. 

( http://www.gabrieldawe.com/bio.html )